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December 16, 2008

Comments

ladyhawker

I'm a lurker on your blog. I have been for a while, but I have to respond to this post.

What a great kid! I don't know if you are a religious person, but one of my favorite hymns is the second verse of "Sunshine in my Soul". The second verse says, "There is music in my soul today. A carol to my King. And Jesus listening can hear the song I can not sing." I have no doubt the music of his soul can be heard by anyone around him that takes the time to listen.

I love his name too.

Carin

He is beautiful...those eyes!

One of the miracles of parenthood is learning the heart of another person so intimately...and from the day they are born the journey begins- verbal language has nothing to do with it. What a privelege~

Ez

What a beautiful and heartwarming post. Thank you for sharing a piece of your heart with us. Your son is a treasure for sure, and your photograph of him is truly wonderful. Thank you.
xo
Ez

Kathy

If you haven't already, read Edgar Sawtelle. http://www.edgarsawtelle.com/ It's a beautiful story about a mute boy and his relationship with his dog. How he communicates with the dogs, how he feels and understand.

I just finished it this weekend and am still spellbound.

Jessie

I keep writing and deleting my comment because I really don't know what I am wanting to say besides what a sweet little boy. I wasn't expecting to be so moved by this post, but your words are beautiful. I love the connection between a child and their parents, and even more so that you know what he is feeling and wanting to say, simply from a look in his eyes. Very precious.

annso

I've never heard of this syndrome before, but as I am french, I can't help but smile at the name of this syndrome: "le syndrome du Cri du Chat". I find it quite poetic.
Anyway, the picture of your son is really beautiful !

Rachel Absher

Thank you for sharing this. He is such a beautiful boy and it makes my heart happy to hear these stories about him.

stacymeyers

I keep retyping this..not sure how to get what I feel across to you. I love this story of your son and he is so very beautiful in every way possible. Thank you so much for sharing this with us..with me. These images are precious..he is so very lucky to have such an amazing mother that loves him and understands him and is so thoughtful about his condition. You are amazing girl!

brooke schwab

beautiful. i don't know how hard it must be to try to understand your sons needs when he can not speak. you have captured your sons love in these photos. i am in awe.

Aimee

Beautifully written, Wynona.

Tracy

Your words were so clear and lovely....thanks for sharing...and introducing us to Gid. What beautiful insight to spread around. I feel grateful...to have that tiny glimpse .
Tracy

Jinny

I think that he is really lovely <3

Laurinda Alves

Thank you Wynona for your words, for your photos and for your generosity. Your son is beautiful and you touched my heart with this post. The way you speak about the way Gideon talks and comunicates is so iluminating and tender that I couldn't resist to write some words in my blog. I posted your photos and words in my portuguese blog (www.laurindaalves.blogs.sapo.pt)and I thank you for making my day today. I'm a journalist, I've been director of a parentig news magazine and I've written a lot about genetic disorders and other disorders. My mother always worked with handicaped children and I know some particular circumstances concerning these particular 'issues'. Thank you for sharing such a beautiful world! Big hug. LA

Chrsitan

OH, he is just so sweet.

Tamer

Very Good Photos. Great from Germany.

Ingrid

Gideon is such a wonder, to everyone who is lucky enough to meet him. I remember how snugly he was in my arms. You are blessed to have him and he is blessed to have such a loving mother like you.

Carol Medina

oh... so sweet... Gideon is lucky to be your son but you are more luck to be his mom... And you have a musician in your house!!! : )

I'm from Brazil and my baby boy Heitor has cleft lip and palate too (His twin brother, Dante, didn't). He did your first surgery and was pretty good...

Your photos are simply wonderful.. congratulations for your work. How you guys (from US) can getty this wonderful light???

If, one day, you come to Brazil, tell in the site because I want to make my family's album with you... heeheheheh... : )

This is our site:
http://www.osthebabys.blogspot.com/

Hugs!
Carol Medina

nicole pitts

Wow his face is so expressive and gorgeous, I would have hard time telling him no to anything ;) I can see he is very loved and look forward to seeing him grow on your blog, now that i have found it!

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I've enjoyed reading the reactions to Bob's comment's about Obama's connection to deliberative politics and his references to the "common good." A recent New Yorker piece takes a similar position and contrasts Obama's "deliberative" style with Clinton's penchant for partisanship: See George Packer's "The Choice" in THE NEW YORKER (Jan 28, 08).

In these discussions about Obama, Democrats, and the common good, it is important to remember that
Michael Tomasky got the Democrats back on to the language of the "common good" with his article, "Party in Search of a Notion," from THE AMERICAN PROSPECT (April 2006).

This talk of the common good, from Tomasky's perspective may be completely in line with partisan politics and need not be identified with deliberation. See Tomasky's review of Krugman's new book, "The Partisan," in the NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS (54:18 Nov 22, 07).

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Just working through some notes on ethics and social networks and I thought I'd share the following paragraph that I've been working on - because it seems counter-intuitive at first.

There is a growing consensus that comments posted in social networks are not ‘in the public domain’ and that researchers should seek permission to use them. Researchers should also remember that because the internet is so readily searchable, they should avoid using literal quotes from social network discussions (in most cases) as this will potentially reveal who the respondent is.

In many codes of ethics and in a growing number of laws, the intention/expectation of the person making a post is important in determining what can be done with that post. In terms of privacy there are two issues. The first is that if a researcher has to join a network to see the post, then the person making the post is doing so in the expectation that they are talking to genuine members of the community, not to professional researchers or journalists. The second that is when somebody makes, say, 200 posts in their status bar over the course of a year, they did not have the expectation that all their quotes would be brought back together as a single corpus for investigation.

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